July 04, 2005

The Gettysburg Address - N'um Getisburg

Pillage Idiot points out that today is also the anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, and links to an image of the Gettysburg Address in Hebrew. I didn't like that translation very much (what I could read of it, it was a real strain for my tired eyes, though it is pretty cool that the Library of Congress had one in its exhibit) and went looking for another. I found this beautiful translation:

 נאום גטיסבורג

19 בנובמבר 1863

לפני שבע ושמונים שנה הולידו אבותינו על יבשת זו אומה חדשה, אשר הורתה בחרות וייעודה האמונה כי כל בני האדם שווים נבראו.

עתה נתונים אנו במלחמת אזרחים גדולה, לבחון אם אומה זו, או כל אומה אשר זו הורתה וזה ייעודה, תיכון לאורך ימים. נפגשים אנו בשדה-מערכה גדול של אותה מלחמה. באנו להקדיש חלקה משדה זה כמקום מנוחה אחרונה לאלה אשר נתנו כאן את חייהם למען תחיה אותה אומה. אכן ראוי ונכון הוא כי כך נעשה.

אולם, במובן עמוק יותר, איננו יכולים להקדיש – איננו יכולים לקדש – איננו יכולים לרומם – קרקע זו. האנשים האמיצים, חיים או מתים, אשר לחמו כאן קידשוה מעל ומעבר לכוחנו להוסיף או לגרוע. העולם כמעט לא ישים לב, אף לא יזכור לאורך ימים, את אשר אנו אומרים כאן, אך הוא לא יוכל לעולם לשכוח את אשר הם עשו כאן. לנו, החיים, מוטב כי נקדיש חיינו למלאכה הלא-גמורה אשר אלה שלחמו כאן החישו עד הנה באצילות כה רבה. לנו מוטב כי נתמסר כאן למשימה הכבירה הניצבת עדיין בפנינו –  כי ממתים דגולים אלה נשאב משנה מסירות לאותה מטרה אשר למענה נתנו הם את מלוא מסירותם – כי נתחייב כאן חגיגית כי מתים אלה לא לשוא היה מותם – כי אומה זו, תחת שמי אדוני, תזכה ללידה חדשה של חופש – וכי ממשלה של העם, על-ידי העם, למען העם, לא תכלה מן הארץ.

The Gettysburg Address

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

UPDATE: Well, maybe I'm making a fool of myself, but I can't help trying my hand at improving the text above:

לפני שבע ושמונים שנה הולידו אבותינו על יבשת זו אומה חדשה, אשר הורתה בחרות וייעודה האמונה כי כל בני האדם שווים נבראו.

עתה נתונים אנו במלחמת אזרחים גדולה, לבחון אם אומה זו, או כל אומה אשר זו הורתה וזה ייעודה, תיכון לאורך ימים. נפגשים אנו בשדה-מערכה גדול של אותה מלחמה. באנו להקדיש חלקה משדה זה כמקום מנוחה אחרונה לאלה אשר נתנו כאן את חייהם למען תחיה אותה אומה. אכן ראוי ונכון הוא כי כך נעשה.

אולם, במובן רחב יותר, איננו יכולים להקדיש – איננו יכולים לקדש – איננו יכולים לרומם – קרקע זו. האנשים האמיצים, החיים והמתים, אשר לחמו כאן קידשוה מעל ומעבר לכוחנו להוסיף או לגרוע. העולם במעט יכיר, ובמעט יזכור, את אשר אומרים כאן, אך לעולם לא יוכל לשכוח את אשר עשו כאן.  הרי לנו, החיים, להיות כאן מוקדשים למלאכה הלא-גמורה אשר אלה שלחמו כאן החישו עד הנה באצילות כה רבה.  הרי לנו להתמסר כאן למשימה הכבירה הניצבת עדיין בפנינו –  כי ממתים דגולים אלה נשאב מסירות מוגברת לאותה מטרה אשר למענה נתנו הם את מלוא מסירותם – כי נתחייב כאן שמתים אלה לא מתו לשוא – כי אומה זו, בסיעתא דשמיא, תזכה ללידת חופש חדשה – וכי ממשל העם, על-ידי העם, למען העם, לא תכלה מן הארץ.

Posted by David Boxenhorn at July 4, 2005 09:12 PM | TrackBacks
Comments & Trackbacks

Jews in odd places: Critical Mastiff offers his Thoughts on Batman Begins. If you're planning to see the movie, though, beware there are spoilers. In honor of the anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, Pillage Idiot presents the Gettysburg Address...   ... more

Trackback by: Soccer Dad (Haveil Havalim #28) at July 10, 2005 01:31 PM Permalink

How did you try to improve the translation?

Posted by: Amritas at July 5, 2005 06:20 AM Permalink

Amritas: It is interesting that you ask. It was late last night when I tried improving the translation, mostly because I couldn't let stand one howler. The author translates the phrase "under God" as "under the Lord's heavens" - which not only makes no sense in Hebrew, but strikes me as very unpoetic. Clearly the translator is unfamiliar with religious expressions, for there are plenty, in Hebrew, which convey the appropriate sentiment. The Library of Congress document translates it as "with the help of God" which is literally appropriate, however its precise wording (בעזרת האל) is unidiomatic. I used the phrase "with the help of heaven" (בסיעתא דשמיא) - a stock phrase in Hebrew (borrowed from Aramaic) which translates not only the literal sentiments, but gives some feeling of God being above us, and is a phrase that I feel Lincoln could actually have used if he were speaking Hebrew.

Having done that, I made what I thought were other improvements in the text where it seemed awkward to me. The original translation of "In a larger sense" was "in a deeper sense" - I changed it to "in a wider sense", which I thought both sounded nicer, and was more faithful to the original (translating it literally clearly doesn't work). "The world will little note, nor long remember" is hard to translate into Hebrew because Hebrew doesn't have the word "nor" - instead you would say "and", making the second phrase negative. The closest you can get, literally, is something like, "The world will little note, and for a long time not remember" but that, in my opinion, loses the beauty and rhythm of the original. I translated it as "The world will little note, and little remember". The original translation was, to my mind, completely ridiculous - in fact, I felt that I had to rework the translation of the entire sentence - it is semantically complex, and Lincoln clearly used the full power of English grammar to guide the listener through it. Hebrew grammar has a different set of tools - it needs to be as carefully crafted in Hebrew as it was in English. I'm pretty happy with the translation I found (which not always the case).

I also made some other changes here and there, where I thought the translation was awkward. All in all, I didn't change much. I was inspired to make these changes because I thought that overall the translation was good, except for a few flaws which could be fixed.

Posted by: David Boxenhorn at July 5, 2005 11:28 AM Permalink

I just discovered this blog entry from Language Log:

In short, the phrase "under God" had nothing to do with God's temporal sovereignity; it was, rather, a way of acknowledging that the efforts of men are always contingent on His providence. And that is how Lincoln intended it, as meaning something like "with God's help, of course"

Posted by: David Boxenhorn at July 5, 2005 12:19 PM Permalink

It's a beautiful text in all languages, in all versions, but I like Elitzur version's better.

Especially the final line, of+by+for the People, in Elitzur's version (ממשלה של העם, על-ידי העם, למען העם) you get the music of the original English, where the stress is on the preposition, is lost in your version.

Posted by: Danny at July 5, 2005 06:00 PM Permalink

Danny, I put some thought into that particular change, and I had the same reaction as you did. But then, after reading the Library of Congress version, I changed my mind. "Mimshal ha`am" stands better on its own, which (if you can put aside the original) has the effect that the "by the people, for the people" comes as a kind of pleasant surprise, more effectively dramatizing its point.

Posted by: David Boxenhorn at July 5, 2005 08:37 PM Permalink

Nice Job. =-)

Posted by: Jeffrey at July 11, 2005 04:09 AM Permalink

Thanks, Jeffrey.

I have to resist the temptation to fiddle with it endlessly. Nothing works perfectly.

Posted by: David Boxenhorn at July 11, 2005 09:50 AM Permalink